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Education Newsletter - August 2014-Back to School »

As the school year begins here are just a few things that you may want to plan for:

1) Lots of swooping and dodging and flying will occur during the one hour Classic in the Jurassic Dinosaur Train special. The Olympic type competition on August 18th at 11 a.m. pegs dinosaur teams against each other to see which team wins best in show. The Dinosaur Train series teaches children PreK-1st grade about life science and natural history. As they explore a variety of animals, children develop the inquiry skills and knowledge needed to help them think, talk and act like paleontologists.

2) Lifelong learning continues with PBS TeacherLine. Online professional development courses begin September 17th. Enroll now for CLUs and graduate credit.

3) Join our new social media pages for teachers! Look for LPB LearningMedia on both Facebook and Google+. Get timely updates on upcoming events and programs, as well as featured resources from our digital collection. Get interactive with us and BE MORE with LPB! Facebook, Google+

4) Each month from October through April a free Electronic Field Trip from Colonial Williamsburg is offered on demand through LPB. Pre-registration, which is required, and further information is available at http://www.lpb.org/etrips. The first trip, The Global Economy, is available October 9th. What we think of as the modern global economy is actually centuries old! Join Maggie, an adventurous rat, as she boards ships using international trade routes to make her way home from England to the American colonies. Along the way, discover the inner workings of the eighteenth-century mercantile system.

5) Catcher in the Rye, one of the most popular books of all times, is a particular favorite among teens and young adults. Enliven your discussion of J.D. Salinger and his novels with teaching resources and excerpts from the American Masters film collection found in http://lpb.pbslearningmedia.org/collection/amast/?topic_id=906 (Register and log-in first at lpb.org/education.)

Not teaching Salinger? Explore resources about Tennessee Williams, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Harper Lee, Carl Sandburg, and others.

Not teaching literature? The American Masters Collection also explores the lives and works of the most enduring writers, musicians, visual and performing artists, dramatists and filmmakers who have left an indelible impression on our nation’s culture. Register free for LPB LearningMedia at http://lpb.org/education.

6) Here are two questions—economic and civic—for you and your students. Should American corporations, which sell their products worldwide, be able to relocate to foreign countries to avoid paying U.S. corporate income taxes? According to a Bloomberg analysis American countries may be siphoning as much as $2 trillion in cash overseas. Would you support a presidential move circumventing Congress to stop the drain of revenue? That’s the issue up for discussion now. Read more about it at http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/06/business/Action-in-washington-on-corporate-inversions.html?emc=edit_au_20140805&nl=afternoonupdate&nlid=62219771&_r=0 . Explore the concept of separation of power at http://lpb.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/51b8859a-8712-435f-92b3-d90283204a73/separation-of-powers/.

7) The Metropolitan Museum of Art has made 500 collection highlights available on its website for everyone. Your students can view and read the history of some pretty amazing paintings, sculptures, photographs, fashions, musical instruments, furniture and more at http://www.metmuseum.org/one-met-many-worlds/eng/objects. If you want students to learn about the careers of contemporary arts then explore Art School, a collection of interviews and hands-on demonstration of techniques or concepts available in LPB LearningMedia. Discovery Education also offers an Art and Artist collection that helps answer “What is Art?”
Log on to these services at http://lpb.org/education.

8) In October on http://lpb.org/education, LPB and the Department of Environmental Quality will launch videos and web resources to help Louisiana students learn about the air they breathe. During a live webinar your students will have an opportunity to pose their environmental questions to experts from DEQ. Watch for the announcement when the resources are available and webinar registration opens.

9) Set your recorder to capture the entire, Ken Burns’s seven part, 14 hour documentary on The Roosevelts that airs September 14th through the 20th at 7:00 p.m. and repeats at 9:00 p.m. (except Friday which begins at 9:30). For the first time in a single narrative, the series weaves the stories of Theodore, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, three members of one of the most prominent and influential families in American politics. The series begins with Theodore and the building of the Panama Canal. FDR leads the nation through the Great Depression, the New Deal, Pearl Harbor and World War II. Eleanor rejects the traditional role of first lady, becomes a sometimes controversial political force, and a champion of civil rights, civil liberties and the United Nations.

10) Dorothea Lange is best known for her powerful photographic images during the Great Depression. More than four decades of 20th-century America were filtered through Lange’s life and lens - her creations and achievements, her tragedies and losses. On Friday, August 29th at 9:00 p.m. American Masters premieres a film, Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightening, produced by Lange’s granddaughter.

11) Six new documentaries in the Makers project feature groundbreaking American women in different spheres of influence. Each program will profile prominent women and relate their struggles, triumphs and contributions as they reshaped and transformed the landscape of their chosen vocations. The series airs on LPB HD Tuesdays, September 30th-November 4th at 8:00-9:00 p.m.

“Women in War” looks at American women’s increasing participation in war as nurses, soldiers, journalists, diplomats and spies. Among those featured are Linda Bray, the first woman to lead troops into battle, former spy Valerie Plame Wilson and correspondent Christiane Amanpour.

“Women in Space” traces the history of women pioneers in the U.S. space program. The episode includes an interview with Eileen Collins, the first woman to pilot a spacecraft. The program includes interviews with spacecraft pilot Eileen Collins, astronaut Mae Jemison, and Peggy Whitson, the first female commander of the International Space Station.

“Women in Comedy” tracks the rise of women in the world of comedy, from the “dangerous” comedy of 70s sitcoms like “Maude” to the groundbreaking women of the 1980s American comedy club boom to today’s multifaceted landscape. Contemporary comics, including Chelsea Handler, Mo’Nique, Sarah Silverman, Lily Tomlin, Carol Burnett, Ellen DeGeneres, Jane Lynch and Kathy Griffin, talk about women in this competitive environment.

“Women in Business” tells the story of the exceptional women who have taken the world of business by storm. Told by female business leaders themselves, this is a candid exploration of what it takes to make it and a celebration of the extraordinary individuals who, over the course of 50 years, have proven that a woman’s place is wherever she believes it to be. Some of the featured business leaders include Cathy Hughes, Martha Stewart and Sheryl Sandberg.

“Women in Hollywood” showcases the women of showbiz, from the earliest pioneers to present-day power players, as they influence the creation of one of the country’s biggest commodities: entertainment. Audiences hear from Jane Fonda, Shonda Rhimes, Lena Dunham and Glenn Close.

“Women in Politics” profiles women in public office who were “firsts” in their fields. From the first woman elected to Congress in 1916 to a young woman running for Detroit City Council in 2013, the documentary explores the challenges confronting American women in politics. Represented are leaders in Washington, including Senators Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Susan Collins (R-ME) and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI).

12) The Tiger Family is expanding and Daniel finds out that he is going to be a big brother! “Meet the New Baby” in DANIEL TIGER’S Neighborhood on August 18th at 10 a.m. At first Daniel isn't sure what to expect, but as his family prepares for the arrival of the new baby, Daniel learns what it means to be a big brother and a big helper, too. An app, Daniel Tiger’s Grr-ific Feelings, extends the series’ social-emotional curriculum, helping kids identify and express their feelings through four engaging activities. The iPad app ($2.99), designed for children ages 2-5 and produced by The Fred Rogers Company, is now available at the App Store.

13) Peg+ Cat Join Peg and her side-kick Cat on a series of totally amazing adventures, learning about measurement, shapes, and patterns and using math to solve really big problems! http://pbskids.org/lab/show/peg-cat/#filter-mobile.

14) Each year Jump$tart, a collaboration of financial institutions, hosts a day-long conference for teachers and youth/community development professionals. This year the Financial Education Boot Camp is Friday, October 3rd in Baton Rouge. Get details and register at http://www.louisianajumpstart.org.

15) Ever wonder what is the oldest written music? It is thought to be the Ugarit musical notation discovered on clay tablets in Ugarit, Syria, dating back to 3400 B.C. Curious what it would sound like? Listen as a composition based on the Ugarit is played by Pianist Malek Jandali with The Ludwig Symphony http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NeP_AS0DqaU.

 
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