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Panelist Bio

Michael Xenos

Michael Xenos earned his Ph.D. in political science, with a concentration in political communication, from the University of Washington in 2005. From 2005 to 2008, he was an assistant professor in the Department of Communication arts at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In 2008, he joined the Louisiana State University faculty as an assistant professor with a joint appointment in the Manship School of Mass Communication and in the Department of Political Science. He is also a Deputy Director of the Public Policy Research Lab at LSU, where he directs the Manship School Media Effects Laboratory.

Dr. Xenos has research interests in political communication, civic engagement, public opinion, and new media. He is especially interested in studying the effects of new media on politics, and has published a number of studies exploring the ways in which new technologies and media forms may be changing how candidates, activists, and ordinary citizens experience the political world. For example, some of his previous studies have examined topics such as how congressional and gubernatorial candidates use the web to campaign for office, whether political comedy programs such as The Daily Show help citizens learn about public issues, and the effectiveness of efforts to reach younger voters through the web.

Current Topic

11/15 - Living Below the Line

What is living in poverty like?

Special Presentation

Breaking Away:  A Louisiana Public Square Special Presentation

Would the breakaway City of St. George quash Baton Rouge’s school desegregation progress?


Recent Topics

10/15 - Funding the Future: Early Childhood Opportunities

How can improving early childhood programs improve the state’s educational outcomes, workforce, and economics?

09/15 - Agenda Louisiana

What issues will candidates face and where do they stand?

08/15 - Louisiana Post-Katrina: A Decade of Difference

What difference has a decade made?

07/15 - Symbol or Statement? History in Public Spaces

Is the display of Civil War statues in public justified or do they belong only in museums?

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