08/12 - Bullying in Louisiana | Louisiana Public Square | LPB
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08/12 - Bullying in Louisiana

How can students, parents and teachers fight bullying?

National statistics indicate that nearly 1 in 3 students is involved in bullying. Louisiana has recently seen three high profile suicides linked to bullying at school. So, who is most at risk of being bullied? What is considered cyber bullying? And how can students, parents and teachers stand up against this aggressive behavior?

A new anti-bullying state law goes into effect this coming school year, but is the statute too broad in its definition of bullying or not inclusive enough? Explore the answers to these questions and more as “Louisiana Public Square” goes on the road to investigate “Bullying in Louisiana” Wednesday, August 22nd at 7 p.m. on LPB HD.

Click here to take the online survey

Our Panelists:

Special thanks to the Pointe Coupee Historical Society for the use of the Julien Poydras Center in New Roads.


Bullying Prevention Resources

The Bully Project – A Social Action Campaign for the film “Bully”
http://thebullyproject.com/

Stopbullying.gov - Bullying prevention resources for young people, parents, and educators provided by the White House
http://www.stopbullying.gov/

“See a Bully; Stop a Bully” – Bullying prevention resources for educators and administrators from the American Federation of Teachers http://www.aft.org/

Bullying Prevention Resource Guide – A guide to what works and doesn’t work produced by the Partnership for Families & Children http://www.bullyingprevention.org/

National Bullying Prevention Center – Produced by the Parent Advocacy Coalition for Educational Rights (PACER)
http://www.pacer.org/bullying/

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline -Free and confidential emotional support 24/7 to people in crisis or emotional distress http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

crisischat.org – A 24/7 online resource of the Baton Rouge Crisis Intervention (BRCIC)
http://www.crisischat.org/

Crisis hotline - (800) 437-0303 – 24/7 service of the BRCIC.
There is no standard definition of a crisis, it is a self defined event.

The Baton Rouge Crisis Intervention Center (BRCIC) - Internationally recognized center providing prevention, intervention and post-intervention services to those in crisis. http://www.brcic.org

The Hannah Pauley Foundation – Dedicated to providing financial assistance to get counseling for children
1531 Hodges Street
Lake Charles, LA 70601
(337) 478-1333
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

We want to know your opinion! Leave your comments in the box below.


So you are doing a show on bullying in the school system…interesting as Ms. Haynes and organization have done one of the most outlandish acts of bullying ever witnessed in the education system…bullying is bullying regardless of who does it…..

Posted by Carolyn Hoover  on  07/29  at  10:37 PM

I agree with the Father on the panel I have a grand daughter that was being bullied by her teacher she was seven years old she would get so sick when it was time to go to school and her mother did not no what to do she went to the school to talk to the teacher then it got worse, then I decided to visit the school when i got there and went to the class room she was pulling her hair and telling her to set down that day she used the bathroom on her self I was so upset I walk in the room and asked what was she doing she told me that she was trying to get her from twisting her hair I went to the office and reported it and nothing was ever done she did not bother her any more but she did put paper over her door so you could not see in her class she could have been doing it to other kids to. And as for Mr. Bengel bulling been around for a long time and it was bad back then and I am 48 years old and I seen it when I was in school they just called it suicid without looking into the reason why the kid killed them self.

Posted by April Cola  on  08/23  at  02:59 AM

It is a shame that after media awareness and legal actions, bullying continues to make the lives of many students miserable. Unless campus management directly involves and introduces severe punishments to those who bulley, it is impossible to eliminate this evil.

Posted by Jenny  on  09/01  at  08:15 AM

As the Headmaster of Delhi Charter School in Delhi, Louisiana from 12/05-6/12(seven years), I have dealt with many bullying issues at that school. There was not enough proactive and disciplinary support at our school during my tenure. As a Master’s Degreed Clinical Psychologist, I must say that much more emphasis should be put on the prevention of bullying in our schools. I had to serve as the guidance counselor and disciplinarian at our school. My son was a student at our school during my tenure as the Headmaster, and he did not tell me until after he had graduated how much he had been bullied at our school. Shame on the Administration, Board Members, faculty, and politicians for not taking a more proactive, punitive approach to bullying.

Posted by Steve Gaharan  on  09/05  at  11:33 AM

I just happened to tune in to your program about bullying Saturday, Sept. 1. My children are grown, but I have elementary aged grandchildren so bullying is a concern to me. The program was informational from many views. Hopefully we will all start listening to the young people in our lives and prayerfully address this social epidemic then take action for the welfare of the next generation. Too many have been lost to this insensitivity and lack of respect. Thank you for airing this program. I am one person that has been inspired to make a difference even if it’s for one child’s welfare.

Posted by Trudy Broussard  on  09/05  at  11:35 AM

I personally was never physically bullied or tossed into dumpsters, but I definitely was verbally and socially bullied. I remember one time someone screamed ‘fag’ at me in the hallway, and I screamed back, ‘Yeah, but can you spell it?’ Everyone in the hallway laughed at the other kid; it was nice to reverse the abuse.

Posted by Bullied  on  09/12  at  01:14 PM

A thoughtful article about one topic, which will plague us for a long time to come. It is truly a shame that after so many activities, bullying is still an essential part of school life. It is good to see that someone is trying to make a difference even it is through a small excerpt of text. Hopefully, in the future we will be able to understand each other better, and will be able to put an end to this constantly ongoing problem. Great job for the article. Let’s see if it will reach the right ears for its message.

Posted by avocat  on  10/09  at  04:10 PM

Bullying is wrong no matter who is doing it. It is very important for us as a society to stand up to these people to enable a fair environment for everyone.

Posted by Amy Carter  on  11/20  at  11:29 AM

I had to serve as the guidance counselor and disciplinarian at our school. My son was a student at our school during my tenure as the Headmaster, and he did not tell me until after he had graduated how much he had been bullied at our school. Shame on the Administration, Board Members, faculty, and politicians for not taking a more proactive, punitive approach to bullying.

Posted by John  on  11/28  at  11:27 AM

I had to serve as the guidance counselor and disciplinarian at our school. My son was a student at our school during my tenure as the Headmaster, and he did not tell me until after he had graduated how much he had been bullied at our school. Shame on the Administration, Board Members, faculty, and politicians for not taking a more proactive, punitive approach to bullying.

Posted by Rachel Rojas  on  12/02  at  09:15 AM
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08/16 - Louisiana Post-Katrina: A Decade of Difference (encore)

What difference has a decade made?

Due to severe flooding in Baton Rouge and the surrounding communities, the recording of “Black & The Blue,” which was to be the August episode of Louisiana Public Square, was cancelled. Instead we will be broadcasting an encore presentation of “Louisiana Post-Katrina: A Decade of Difference.” More information, including broadcast dates and times, is below.

“Louisiana Post-Katrina: A Decade of Difference”
Eleven years ago, Hurricane Katrina swept through Southeast Louisiana, triggering what would become the nation’s costliest disaster. Less than a month later, Hurricane Rita inundated Southwest Louisiana forever altering the landscape. The storms uprooted residents, while the rest of Louisiana and its neighboring states welcomed them with open arms.
What affect did the storms have on economic development along the I-10 corridor? Just over a decade later, how have public services changed? How prepared is Louisiana to handle hurricane evacuees? And how did the hurricanes change the demographics of the state?
This month Louisiana Public Square takes a look at where the state is now on an encore presentation of “Louisiana Post-Katrina: A Decade of Difference” airing Wednesday, August 17 at 7 p.m. and Sunday, August 21 at 11 a.m. on LPB HD.

The panelists are:
· Andy Kopplin, Office of New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu
· Paul Rainwater, Rainwater Consulting, LLC
· Stephanie Riegel, Greater Baton Rouge Business Report
· Nihal Shrinath, The Data Center

The program includes interviews with Jason El Koubi, One Acadiana; Chris Guilbeaux, Governor’s Office of Homeland Security & Emergency Preparedness (GOHSEP); Kathy Kliebert, Secretary of the Department of Health and Hospitals; Allison Plyer, Executive Director of the Data Center; John White, State Superintendent of Education; and Christopher Bohnstengel and “Byrdie” Lane, owners of Byrdie’s Gallery and Café in New Orleans.

LPB CEO, Beth Courtney, and Kim Hunter Reed,Ph.D., who served in the Blanco administration during Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, moderate the discussion.
“Louisiana Post-Katrina: A Decade of Difference” will also air in New Orleans, on WLAE. It can also be heard on public radio stations WRKF in Baton Rouge; Red River Radio in Shreveport and Monroe; and WWNO in New Orleans. Check their station websites for schedule.

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